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Best English & Gujarati Medium School In Nikol Ahmedabad Calendar https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org Knowledge is Power: My Calendar Events en-US hiral.srashtasoft@gmail.com (Best English & Gujarati Medium School In Nikol Ahmedabad Admin) My Calendar WordPress Plugin http://www.joedolson.com/my-calendar/ MAHA SHIVRATRI https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=535 Fri, 12 Jul 2019 12:34:12 +0000 admin
MAHA SHIVRATRI
Maha Shivaratri is celebrated in Tamil Nadu with great pomp and fanfare in the Annamalai temple located in Tiruvannamalai district. The special process of worship on this day is 'Girivalam'/Giri Pradakshina, a 14-kilometer bare foot walk around Lord Shiva's temple on top of the hill. A huge lamp of oil and camphor is lit on the hilltop at sunset - not to be confused with Karthigai Deepam.

The major Jyotirlinga Shiva temples of India, such as in Varanasi and Somanatha, are particularly frequented on Maha Shivaratri. They serve also as sites for fairs and special events.[18]

In Andhra and Telangana, Shivratri yatras are held at Mallayya gutta near Kambhalapalle, Gundlakamma Kona near Railway Koduru, Penchalakona, Bhairavakona, Uma Maheswaram amongst others. Special pujas are held at Pancharamas - Amararamam of Amaravati, Somaramam of Bhimavaram, Draksharamam, Kumararama of Samarlakota and Ksheerarama of Palakollu. The days immediately after Shivratri are celebrated as Brahmotsavaalu at Srisailam, one of 12 Jyotirlinga sites. Mahashivaratri utsavalu are held at the Rudreshwara Swamy's 1000 pillar temple in Warangal. Devotees throng for the special poojas at Srikalahasti, Mahanandi, Yaganti, Antarvedi, Kattamanchi, Pattiseema, Bhairavakona, Hanmakonda, Keesaragutta, Vemulawada, Panagal, Kolanupaka amongst others.

The Mandi fair is in the town of Mandi is particularly famous as a venue for Maha Shivaratri celebrations. It transforms the town as devotees pour in. It is believed that all gods and goddesses of the area, said to number more than 200, assemble here on the day of Maha Shivaratri. Mandi, located on the banks of Beas, is popularly known as the "Cathedral of Temples" and one of the oldest towns of Himachal Pradesh, with about 81 temples of different Gods and Goddesses on its periphery.[19][20][21]

In Kashmir Shaivism, Maha Shivaratri is celebrated by the Brahmins of Kashmir and is called, "Herath" in Kashmiri, a word derived from the Sanskrit word "Hararatri" the "Night of Hara" (another name of Shiva). Shivaratri, regarded as the most important festival of the community, for instance, is celebrated by them on trayodashi or the thirteenth of the dark half of the month of Phalguna (February–March) and not on chaturdashi or the fourteenth as in the rest of the country. The reason for it is that this long drawn festival that is celebrated for one full fortnight as an elaborate ritual is associated with the appearance of Bhairava (Shiva) as a jwala-linga or a linga of flame. It has been described as Bhairavotsava in Tantric texts as on this occasion Bhairava and Bhairavi, His Shakti or cosmic energy, are propitiated through Tantric worship. According to the legend associated with the origin of the worship, the linga appeared at pradoshakala or the dusk of early night as a blazing column of fire and dazzled Vatuka Bhairava and Rama (or Ramana) Bhairava, Mahadevi’s mind-born sons, who approached it to discover its beginning or end but miserably failed. Exasperated and terrified they began to sing its praises and went to Mahadevi, who herself merged with the awe-inspiring jwala-linga. The Goddess blessed both Vatuka and Ramana that they would be worshipped by human beings and would receive their share of sacrificial offerings on that day and those who would worship them would have all their wishes fulfilled. As Vatuka Bhairava emerged from a pitcher full of water after Mahadevi cast a glance into it, fully armed with all his weapons (and so did Rama), he is represented by a pitcher full of water in which walnuts are kept for soaking and worshipped along with Shiva, Parvati, Kumara, Ganesha, their ganas or attendant deities, yoginis and kshetrapalas (guardians of the quarters) - all represented by clay images. The soaked walnuts are later distributed as naivedya. The ceremony is called ’vatuk barun’ in Kashmiri, which means filling the pitcher of water representing the Vatuka Bhairava with walnuts and worshipping it.[citation needed]

Central India has a large number of Shaiva followers. The Mahakaleshwar Temple, Ujjain is one of the most venerated shrines consecrated to Shiva, where a large congregation of devotees gathers to offer prayers on the day of Maha Shivaratri. Tilwara Ghat in the city of Jabalpur and the Math Temple in the village of Jeonara, Seoni are two other places where the festival is celebrated with much religious fervour.[citation needed]

In Punjab, Shobha Yatras would be organised by various Hindu organisations in different cities. It is a grand festival for Punjabi Hindus.

In Gujarat, Maha Shivaratri mela is held at Junagadh where bathing in the Murghi kund is considered holy. According to myth, Lord Shiva himself comes to bath in theMurghi kund.

In West Bengal, Maha Shivaratri is observed devoutly by unmarried girls seeking a suitable husband, often visiting Tarakeswar.

]]>
2020-02-21T00:00:00 2020-02-21T23:59:59

MAHA SHIVRATRI


MAHA SHIVRATRI
Maha Shivaratri is celebrated in Tamil Nadu with great pomp and fanfare in the Annamalai temple located in Tiruvannamalai district. The special process of worship on this day is 'Girivalam'/Giri Pradakshina, a 14-kilometer bare foot walk around Lord Shiva's temple on top of the hill. A huge lamp of oil and camphor is lit on the hilltop at sunset - not to be confused with Karthigai Deepam.

The major Jyotirlinga Shiva temples of India, such as in Varanasi and Somanatha, are particularly frequented on Maha Shivaratri. They serve also as sites for fairs and special events.[18]

In Andhra and Telangana, Shivratri yatras are held at Mallayya gutta near Kambhalapalle, Gundlakamma Kona near Railway Koduru, Penchalakona, Bhairavakona, Uma Maheswaram amongst others. Special pujas are held at Pancharamas - Amararamam of Amaravati, Somaramam of Bhimavaram, Draksharamam, Kumararama of Samarlakota and Ksheerarama of Palakollu. The days immediately after Shivratri are celebrated as Brahmotsavaalu at Srisailam, one of 12 Jyotirlinga sites. Mahashivaratri utsavalu are held at the Rudreshwara Swamy's 1000 pillar temple in Warangal. Devotees throng for the special poojas at Srikalahasti, Mahanandi, Yaganti, Antarvedi, Kattamanchi, Pattiseema, Bhairavakona, Hanmakonda, Keesaragutta, Vemulawada, Panagal, Kolanupaka amongst others.

The Mandi fair is in the town of Mandi is particularly famous as a venue for Maha Shivaratri celebrations. It transforms the town as devotees pour in. It is believed that all gods and goddesses of the area, said to number more than 200, assemble here on the day of Maha Shivaratri. Mandi, located on the banks of Beas, is popularly known as the "Cathedral of Temples" and one of the oldest towns of Himachal Pradesh, with about 81 temples of different Gods and Goddesses on its periphery.[19][20][21]

In Kashmir Shaivism, Maha Shivaratri is celebrated by the Brahmins of Kashmir and is called, "Herath" in Kashmiri, a word derived from the Sanskrit word "Hararatri" the "Night of Hara" (another name of Shiva). Shivaratri, regarded as the most important festival of the community, for instance, is celebrated by them on trayodashi or the thirteenth of the dark half of the month of Phalguna (February–March) and not on chaturdashi or the fourteenth as in the rest of the country. The reason for it is that this long drawn festival that is celebrated for one full fortnight as an elaborate ritual is associated with the appearance of Bhairava (Shiva) as a jwala-linga or a linga of flame. It has been described as Bhairavotsava in Tantric texts as on this occasion Bhairava and Bhairavi, His Shakti or cosmic energy, are propitiated through Tantric worship. According to the legend associated with the origin of the worship, the linga appeared at pradoshakala or the dusk of early night as a blazing column of fire and dazzled Vatuka Bhairava and Rama (or Ramana) Bhairava, Mahadevi’s mind-born sons, who approached it to discover its beginning or end but miserably failed. Exasperated and terrified they began to sing its praises and went to Mahadevi, who herself merged with the awe-inspiring jwala-linga. The Goddess blessed both Vatuka and Ramana that they would be worshipped by human beings and would receive their share of sacrificial offerings on that day and those who would worship them would have all their wishes fulfilled. As Vatuka Bhairava emerged from a pitcher full of water after Mahadevi cast a glance into it, fully armed with all his weapons (and so did Rama), he is represented by a pitcher full of water in which walnuts are kept for soaking and worshipped along with Shiva, Parvati, Kumara, Ganesha, their ganas or attendant deities, yoginis and kshetrapalas (guardians of the quarters) - all represented by clay images. The soaked walnuts are later distributed as naivedya. The ceremony is called ’vatuk barun’ in Kashmiri, which means filling the pitcher of water representing the Vatuka Bhairava with walnuts and worshipping it.[citation needed]

Central India has a large number of Shaiva followers. The Mahakaleshwar Temple, Ujjain is one of the most venerated shrines consecrated to Shiva, where a large congregation of devotees gathers to offer prayers on the day of Maha Shivaratri. Tilwara Ghat in the city of Jabalpur and the Math Temple in the village of Jeonara, Seoni are two other places where the festival is celebrated with much religious fervour.[citation needed]

In Punjab, Shobha Yatras would be organised by various Hindu organisations in different cities. It is a grand festival for Punjabi Hindus.

In Gujarat, Maha Shivaratri mela is held at Junagadh where bathing in the Murghi kund is considered holy. According to myth, Lord Shiva himself comes to bath in theMurghi kund.

In West Bengal, Maha Shivaratri is observed devoutly by unmarried girls seeking a suitable husband, often visiting Tarakeswar.

Begins: All day on February 21, 2020

Ends: on February 21, 2020

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

MAHA SHIVRATRI ]]>
text/html https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=535
REPUBLIC DAY https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=534 Fri, 12 Jul 2019 12:27:12 +0000 admin
REPUBLIC DAY
India achieved independence from British Raj on 15 August 1947 following the Indian independence movement. The independence came through the Indian Independence Act 1947 (10 & 11 Geo 6 c 30), an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that partitioned British India into the two new independent Dominions of the British Commonwealth (later Commonwealth of Nations).[2] India obtained its independence on 15 August 1947 as a constitutional monarchy with George VI as head of state and the Earl Mountbatten as governor-general. The country, though, did not yet have a permanent constitution; instead its laws were based on the modified colonial Government of India Act 1935. On 28 August 1947, the Drafting Committee was appointed to draft a permanent constitution, with Dr B R Ambedkar as chairman. While India's Independence Day celebrates its freedom from British Rule, the Republic Day celebrates the coming into force of its constitution. A draft constitution was prepared by the committee and submitted to the Constituent Assembly on 4 November 1947.[3] The Assembly met, in sessions open to public, for 166 days, spread over a period of two years, 11 months and 18 days before adopting the Constitution. After many deliberations and some modifications, the 308 members of the Assembly signed two hand-written copies of the document (one each in Hindi and English) on 24 January 1950. Two days later which was on 26 January 1950, it came into effect throughout the whole nation. On that day began Dr. Rajendra Prasad's first term of office as President of the Indian Union. The Constituent Assembly became the Parliament of India under the transitional provisions of the new Constitution.This date is celebrated in India as the Republic Day.

]]>
2020-01-26T00:00:00 2020-01-26T23:59:59

REPUBLIC DAY


REPUBLIC DAY
India achieved independence from British Raj on 15 August 1947 following the Indian independence movement. The independence came through the Indian Independence Act 1947 (10 & 11 Geo 6 c 30), an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that partitioned British India into the two new independent Dominions of the British Commonwealth (later Commonwealth of Nations).[2] India obtained its independence on 15 August 1947 as a constitutional monarchy with George VI as head of state and the Earl Mountbatten as governor-general. The country, though, did not yet have a permanent constitution; instead its laws were based on the modified colonial Government of India Act 1935. On 28 August 1947, the Drafting Committee was appointed to draft a permanent constitution, with Dr B R Ambedkar as chairman. While India's Independence Day celebrates its freedom from British Rule, the Republic Day celebrates the coming into force of its constitution. A draft constitution was prepared by the committee and submitted to the Constituent Assembly on 4 November 1947.[3] The Assembly met, in sessions open to public, for 166 days, spread over a period of two years, 11 months and 18 days before adopting the Constitution. After many deliberations and some modifications, the 308 members of the Assembly signed two hand-written copies of the document (one each in Hindi and English) on 24 January 1950. Two days later which was on 26 January 1950, it came into effect throughout the whole nation. On that day began Dr. Rajendra Prasad's first term of office as President of the Indian Union. The Constituent Assembly became the Parliament of India under the transitional provisions of the new Constitution.This date is celebrated in India as the Republic Day.

Begins: All day on January 26, 2020

Ends: on January 26, 2020

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

REPUBLIC DAY ]]>
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VASI UTTARAYAN https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=533 Fri, 12 Jul 2019 12:20:41 +0000 admin

]]>
2020-01-15T00:00:00 2020-01-15T23:59:59

VASI UTTARAYAN

Begins: All day on January 15, 2020

Ends: on January 15, 2020

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

VASI UTTARAYAN ]]>
text/html https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=533
UTTARAYAN https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=532 Fri, 12 Jul 2019 12:14:30 +0000 admin
Uttarayan
Uttarayan, as Makar Sankranti is called in Gujarati, is a major festival in the state of Gujarat[31] which lasts for two days.

14 January is Uttarayan
15 January is Vasi-Uttarayan (Stale Uttarayan).[32]
Gujarati people keenly await this festival to fly kites, called 'patang'. Kites for Uttarayan are made of special light-weight paper and bamboo and are mostly rhombus shaped with central spine and a single bow. The string often contains abrasives to cut down other people's kites.
In Gujarat, from December through to Makar Sankranti, people start enjoying Uttarayan. Undhiyu (spicy, baked mix of winter vegetables) and chikkis (made from til (sesame seeds), peanuts and jaggery) are the special festival recipes savoured on this day. The Hindu Sindhi community in western regions of India, that is also found in southeastern parts of Pakistan, celebrate Makar Sankranti as Tirmoori. On this day, parents sending sweet dishes to their daughters.[33]

In the major cities of Ahmedabad, Surat, Vadodara, Rajkot, and Jamnagar the skies appear filled with thousands upon thousands of kites as people enjoy two full days of Uttarayan on their terraces.

When people cut any kites they yell words like "kaypo chhe", "e lapet","jaay jaay","phirki vet phirki" and "lapet lapet" in Gujarati.

]]>
2020-01-14T00:00:00 2020-01-14T23:59:59

UTTARAYAN


Uttarayan
Uttarayan, as Makar Sankranti is called in Gujarati, is a major festival in the state of Gujarat[31] which lasts for two days.

14 January is Uttarayan
15 January is Vasi-Uttarayan (Stale Uttarayan).[32]
Gujarati people keenly await this festival to fly kites, called 'patang'. Kites for Uttarayan are made of special light-weight paper and bamboo and are mostly rhombus shaped with central spine and a single bow. The string often contains abrasives to cut down other people's kites.
In Gujarat, from December through to Makar Sankranti, people start enjoying Uttarayan. Undhiyu (spicy, baked mix of winter vegetables) and chikkis (made from til (sesame seeds), peanuts and jaggery) are the special festival recipes savoured on this day. The Hindu Sindhi community in western regions of India, that is also found in southeastern parts of Pakistan, celebrate Makar Sankranti as Tirmoori. On this day, parents sending sweet dishes to their daughters.[33]

In the major cities of Ahmedabad, Surat, Vadodara, Rajkot, and Jamnagar the skies appear filled with thousands upon thousands of kites as people enjoy two full days of Uttarayan on their terraces.

When people cut any kites they yell words like "kaypo chhe", "e lapet","jaay jaay","phirki vet phirki" and "lapet lapet" in Gujarati.

Begins: All day on January 14, 2020

Ends: on January 14, 2020

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

UTTARAYAN ]]>
text/html https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=532
CHRISTMAS DAY https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=531 Fri, 12 Jul 2019 12:03:55 +0000 admin
Christmas
Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed on December 25[9][10][4][11][12] as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.[2][13][14] A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night;[15] in some traditions, Christmastide includes an octave.[16] Christmas Day is a public holiday in many of the world's nations,[17][18][19] is celebrated religiously by a majority of Christians,[20] as well as culturally by many non-Christians,[1][21] and forms an integral part of the holiday season centered around it.

The traditional Christmas narrative, the Nativity of Jesus, delineated in the New Testament says that Jesus was born in Bethlehem, in accordance with messianic prophecies.[22] When Joseph and Mary arrived in the city, the inn had no room and so they were offered a stable where the Christ Child was soon born, with angels proclaiming this news to shepherds who then further disseminated the information.[23]

Although the month and date of Jesus' birth are unknown, the church in the early fourth century fixed the date as December 25.[24][25][26] This corresponds to the date of the solstice on the Roman calendar.[27] Most Christians celebrate on December 25 in the Gregorian calendar, which has been adopted almost universally in the civil calendars used in countries throughout the world. However, some Eastern Christian Churches celebrate Christmas on December 25 of the older Julian calendar, which currently corresponds to a January date in the Gregorian calendar. For Christians, the belief that God came into the world in the form of man to atone for the sins of humanity, rather than the exact birth date, is considered to be the primary purpose in celebrating Christmas.[28][29][30][31]

The celebratory customs associated in various countries with Christmas have a mix of pre-Christian, Christian, and secular themes and origins.[32] Popular modern customs of the holiday include gift giving, completing an Advent calendar or Advent wreath, Christmas music and caroling, lighting a Christingle, viewing a Nativity play, an exchange of Christmas cards, church services, a special meal, pulling Christmas crackers and the display of various Christmas decorations, including Christmas trees, Christmas lights, nativity scenes, garlands, wreaths, mistletoe, and holly. In addition, several closely related and often interchangeable figures, known as Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nicholas, and Christkind, are associated with bringing gifts to children during the Christmas season and have their own body of traditions and lore.[33] Because gift-giving and many other aspects of the Christmas festival involve heightened economic activity, the holiday has become a significant event and a key sales period for retailers and businesses. The economic impact of Christmas has grown steadily over the past few centuries in many regions of the world.

]]>
2019-12-25T00:00:00 2019-12-25T23:59:59

CHRISTMAS DAY


Christmas
Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed on December 25[9][10][4][11][12] as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.[2][13][14] A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night;[15] in some traditions, Christmastide includes an octave.[16] Christmas Day is a public holiday in many of the world's nations,[17][18][19] is celebrated religiously by a majority of Christians,[20] as well as culturally by many non-Christians,[1][21] and forms an integral part of the holiday season centered around it.

The traditional Christmas narrative, the Nativity of Jesus, delineated in the New Testament says that Jesus was born in Bethlehem, in accordance with messianic prophecies.[22] When Joseph and Mary arrived in the city, the inn had no room and so they were offered a stable where the Christ Child was soon born, with angels proclaiming this news to shepherds who then further disseminated the information.[23]

Although the month and date of Jesus' birth are unknown, the church in the early fourth century fixed the date as December 25.[24][25][26] This corresponds to the date of the solstice on the Roman calendar.[27] Most Christians celebrate on December 25 in the Gregorian calendar, which has been adopted almost universally in the civil calendars used in countries throughout the world. However, some Eastern Christian Churches celebrate Christmas on December 25 of the older Julian calendar, which currently corresponds to a January date in the Gregorian calendar. For Christians, the belief that God came into the world in the form of man to atone for the sins of humanity, rather than the exact birth date, is considered to be the primary purpose in celebrating Christmas.[28][29][30][31]

The celebratory customs associated in various countries with Christmas have a mix of pre-Christian, Christian, and secular themes and origins.[32] Popular modern customs of the holiday include gift giving, completing an Advent calendar or Advent wreath, Christmas music and caroling, lighting a Christingle, viewing a Nativity play, an exchange of Christmas cards, church services, a special meal, pulling Christmas crackers and the display of various Christmas decorations, including Christmas trees, Christmas lights, nativity scenes, garlands, wreaths, mistletoe, and holly. In addition, several closely related and often interchangeable figures, known as Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nicholas, and Christkind, are associated with bringing gifts to children during the Christmas season and have their own body of traditions and lore.[33] Because gift-giving and many other aspects of the Christmas festival involve heightened economic activity, the holiday has become a significant event and a key sales period for retailers and businesses. The economic impact of Christmas has grown steadily over the past few centuries in many regions of the world.

Begins: All day on December 25, 2019

Ends: on December 25, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

CHRISTMAS DAY ]]>
text/html https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=531
DIWALI VACATION (Approx) https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=30 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 13:44:59 +0000 admin DIWALI
The Diwali festival is likely a fusion of harvest festivals in ancient India.[44] It is mentioned in Sanskrit texts such as the Padma Purana, the Skanda Purana both of which were completed in the second half of the 1st millennium CE. The diyas (lamps) are mentioned in Skanda Kishore Purana as symbolising parts of the sun, describing it as the cosmic giver of light and energy to all life and which seasonally transitions in the Hindu calendar month of Kartik.[35][49]

King Harsha refers to Deepavali, in the 7th century Sanskrit play Nagananda, as Dīpapratipadotsava (dīpa = light, pratipadā = first day, utsava = festival), where lamps were lit and newly engaged brides and grooms received gifts.[50][51] Rajasekhara referred to Deepavali as Dipamalika in his 9th century Kavyamimamsa, wherein he mentions the tradition of homes being whitewashed and oil lamps decorated homes, streets and markets in the night.[50]

Diwali was also described by numerous travellers from outside India. In his 11th century memoir on India, the Persian traveller and historian Al Biruni wrote of Deepavali being celebrated by Hindus on the day of the New Moon in the month of Kartika.[52] The Venetian merchant and traveller Niccolò de' Conti visited India in the early 15th-century and wrote in his memoir, "on another of these festivals they fix up within their temples, and on the outside of the roofs, an innumerable number of oil lamps... which are kept burning day and night" and that the families would gather, "clothe themselves in new garments", sing, dance and feast.[53][54] The 16th-century Portuguese traveller Domingo Paes wrote of his visit to the Hindu Vijayanagara Empire, where Dipavali was celebrated in October with householders illuminating their homes, and their temples, with lamps.[54]

Islamic historians of the Delhi Sultanate and the Mughal Empire era also mentioned Diwali and other Hindu festivals. A few, notably the Mughal emperor Akbar, welcomed and participated in the festivities,[55][56] whereas others banned such festivals as Diwali and Holi, as Aurangzeb did in 1665.[57][58][note 4][note 5]

Publications from the British colonial era also made mention of Diwali, such as the note on Hindu festivals published in 1799 by Sir William Jones, a philologist known for his early observations on Sanskrit and Indo-European languages.[61] In his paper on The Lunar Year of the Hindus, Jones, then based in Bengal, noted four of the five days of Diwali in the autumn months of Aswina-Cartica [sic] as the following: Bhutachaturdasi Yamaterpanam (2nd day), Lacshmipuja dipanwita (the day of Diwali), Dyuta pratipat Belipuja (4th day), and Bhratri dwitiya (5th day). The Lacshmipuja dipanwita, remarked Jones, was a "great festival at night, in honor of Lakshmi, with illuminations on trees and houses".[61][note 6]

]]>
2019-10-24T00:00:00 2019-11-15T23:59:59

DIWALI VACATION (Approx)

DIWALI
The Diwali festival is likely a fusion of harvest festivals in ancient India.[44] It is mentioned in Sanskrit texts such as the Padma Purana, the Skanda Purana both of which were completed in the second half of the 1st millennium CE. The diyas (lamps) are mentioned in Skanda Kishore Purana as symbolising parts of the sun, describing it as the cosmic giver of light and energy to all life and which seasonally transitions in the Hindu calendar month of Kartik.[35][49]

King Harsha refers to Deepavali, in the 7th century Sanskrit play Nagananda, as Dīpapratipadotsava (dīpa = light, pratipadā = first day, utsava = festival), where lamps were lit and newly engaged brides and grooms received gifts.[50][51] Rajasekhara referred to Deepavali as Dipamalika in his 9th century Kavyamimamsa, wherein he mentions the tradition of homes being whitewashed and oil lamps decorated homes, streets and markets in the night.[50]

Diwali was also described by numerous travellers from outside India. In his 11th century memoir on India, the Persian traveller and historian Al Biruni wrote of Deepavali being celebrated by Hindus on the day of the New Moon in the month of Kartika.[52] The Venetian merchant and traveller Niccolò de' Conti visited India in the early 15th-century and wrote in his memoir, "on another of these festivals they fix up within their temples, and on the outside of the roofs, an innumerable number of oil lamps... which are kept burning day and night" and that the families would gather, "clothe themselves in new garments", sing, dance and feast.[53][54] The 16th-century Portuguese traveller Domingo Paes wrote of his visit to the Hindu Vijayanagara Empire, where Dipavali was celebrated in October with householders illuminating their homes, and their temples, with lamps.[54]

Islamic historians of the Delhi Sultanate and the Mughal Empire era also mentioned Diwali and other Hindu festivals. A few, notably the Mughal emperor Akbar, welcomed and participated in the festivities,[55][56] whereas others banned such festivals as Diwali and Holi, as Aurangzeb did in 1665.[57][58][note 4][note 5]

Publications from the British colonial era also made mention of Diwali, such as the note on Hindu festivals published in 1799 by Sir William Jones, a philologist known for his early observations on Sanskrit and Indo-European languages.[61] In his paper on The Lunar Year of the Hindus, Jones, then based in Bengal, noted four of the five days of Diwali in the autumn months of Aswina-Cartica [sic] as the following: Bhutachaturdasi Yamaterpanam (2nd day), Lacshmipuja dipanwita (the day of Diwali), Dyuta pratipat Belipuja (4th day), and Bhratri dwitiya (5th day). The Lacshmipuja dipanwita, remarked Jones, was a "great festival at night, in honor of Lakshmi, with illuminations on trees and houses".[61][note 6]

Begins: All day on October 24, 2019

Ends: on November 15, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

DIWALI VACATION (Approx) ]]>
text/html https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=30
VIJAYADASHAMI https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=29 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 13:34:19 +0000 admin
VIJAYADASHAMI
Vijayadashami (IAST: Vijayadaśamī, pronounced [ʋɪʝəjəðəʃmɪ]]) also known as Dasahara, Dusshera, Dasara, Dussehra or Dashain is a major Hindu festival celebrated at the end of Navratri every year. It is observed on the tenth day in the Hindu calendar month of Ashvin, the seventh month of the Hindu Luni-Solar Calendar, which typically falls in the Gregorian months of September and October.

Vijayadashami is observed for different reasons and celebrated differently in various parts of South Asia.[7][1][8][4] In the southern, eastern and northeastern states of India, Vijayadashami marks the end of Durga Puja, remembering goddess Durga's victory over the buffalo demon Mahishasura to restore and protect dharma.[4][9] In the northern and western states, the festival is synonymously called Dussehra (also spelled Dasara, Dashahara). In these regions, it marks the end of "Ramlila" and remembers God Rama's victory over the Ravana. On the very same occasion; Arjuna alone decimated 1 lakh+ soldiers & defeated all Kuru warriors including Bhishma, Drona, Ashwatthama, Karna, Kripa etc.- there by significantly quoting the natural example of victory of good (Dharma) over evil (Adharma). Alternatively it marks a reverence for one of the aspects of goddess Devi such as Durga or Saraswati.

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2019-10-08T00:00:00 2019-10-08T23:59:59

VIJAYADASHAMI


VIJAYADASHAMI
Vijayadashami (IAST: Vijayadaśamī, pronounced [ʋɪʝəjəðəʃmɪ]]) also known as Dasahara, Dusshera, Dasara, Dussehra or Dashain is a major Hindu festival celebrated at the end of Navratri every year. It is observed on the tenth day in the Hindu calendar month of Ashvin, the seventh month of the Hindu Luni-Solar Calendar, which typically falls in the Gregorian months of September and October.

Vijayadashami is observed for different reasons and celebrated differently in various parts of South Asia.[7][1][8][4] In the southern, eastern and northeastern states of India, Vijayadashami marks the end of Durga Puja, remembering goddess Durga's victory over the buffalo demon Mahishasura to restore and protect dharma.[4][9] In the northern and western states, the festival is synonymously called Dussehra (also spelled Dasara, Dashahara). In these regions, it marks the end of "Ramlila" and remembers God Rama's victory over the Ravana. On the very same occasion; Arjuna alone decimated 1 lakh+ soldiers & defeated all Kuru warriors including Bhishma, Drona, Ashwatthama, Karna, Kripa etc.- there by significantly quoting the natural example of victory of good (Dharma) over evil (Adharma). Alternatively it marks a reverence for one of the aspects of goddess Devi such as Durga or Saraswati.

Begins: All day on October 8, 2019

Ends: on October 8, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

VIJAYADASHAMI ]]>
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GANDHI JAYANTI https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=28 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 13:26:46 +0000 admin GANDHI JAYANTI
Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated yearly on 2nd October. It is one of the official declared national holidays of India, observed in all of its states and union territories.

Gandhi Jayanti is marked by prayer services and tributes all over India, including at Gandhi's memorial in New Delhi where he was cremated. Popular activities include prayer meetings, commemorative ceremonies in different cities by colleges, local government institutions and socio-political institutions. Painting and essay competitions are conducted and best awards are granted for projects in schools and the community encouraging a non-violent way of life as well as celebrating Gandhi's effort in the Indian independence movement.[2] Gandhi's favourite bhajan (Hindu devotional song), Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram, is usually sung in his memory.[3] Statues of Mahatma Gandhi throughout the country are decorated with flowers and garlands, and some people avoid drinking alcohol or eating meat on the day.[4] Public buildings, banks and post offices are closed.[4]

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2019-10-02T00:00:00 2019-10-02T23:59:59

GANDHI JAYANTI

GANDHI JAYANTI
Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated yearly on 2nd October. It is one of the official declared national holidays of India, observed in all of its states and union territories.

Gandhi Jayanti is marked by prayer services and tributes all over India, including at Gandhi's memorial in New Delhi where he was cremated. Popular activities include prayer meetings, commemorative ceremonies in different cities by colleges, local government institutions and socio-political institutions. Painting and essay competitions are conducted and best awards are granted for projects in schools and the community encouraging a non-violent way of life as well as celebrating Gandhi's effort in the Indian independence movement.[2] Gandhi's favourite bhajan (Hindu devotional song), Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram, is usually sung in his memory.[3] Statues of Mahatma Gandhi throughout the country are decorated with flowers and garlands, and some people avoid drinking alcohol or eating meat on the day.[4] Public buildings, banks and post offices are closed.[4]

Begins: All day on October 2, 2019

Ends: on October 2, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

GANDHI JAYANTI ]]>
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MUHARRAM https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=536 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 13:20:53 +0000 admin MUHARRAM
Muḥarram (Arabic: مُحَرَّم‎) is the first month of the Islamic calendar. It is one of the four sacred months of the year during which warfare is forbidden.[caption id="attachment_2362" align="aligncenter" width="600"]<img src="https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Muharram_Taziya_pro[caption id="attachment_2362" align="aligncenter" width="600"] 80808080[/caption]cession_Barabanki_India_Jan_2009-600x450.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="450" class="size-medium wp-image-2362" /> 80808080[/caption] It is held to be the second holiest month, after Ramaḍān. Since the Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar, Muharram moves from year to year when compared with the Gregorian calendar.

The tenth day of Muharram is known as the Day of Ashura, part of the Mourning of Muharram for Shia Muslims and a day of fasting for Sunni Muslims. The practice of fasting during Ashura stems from the hadith that Musa (Moses) and his people obtained a victory over the Egyptian Pharaoh on the 10th day of Muharram; accordingly Muhammad asked Muslims to fast on this day and on the day prior, the Day of Tasu'a.

Shia Muslims mourn the death of Ḥusayn ibn ʿAlī and his family, honoring the martyrs by prayer and abstinence from joyous events. Shia Muslims do not fast on the 10th of Muharram, but some will not eat or drink until zawal (afternoon) to show their sympathy with Husayn.[3] In addition there is an important ziyarat book, the Ziyarat Ashura about Husayn ibn Ali. In the Shia sect, it is popular to read this ziyarat on this date.

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2019-09-10T00:00:00 2019-09-10T23:59:59

MUHARRAM

MUHARRAM
Muḥarram (Arabic: مُحَرَّم‎) is the first month of the Islamic calendar. It is one of the four sacred months of the year during which warfare is forbidden.[caption id="attachment_2362" align="aligncenter" width="600"]<img src="https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Muharram_Taziya_pro[caption id="attachment_2362" align="aligncenter" width="600"] 80808080[/caption]cession_Barabanki_India_Jan_2009-600x450.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="450" class="size-medium wp-image-2362" /> 80808080[/caption] It is held to be the second holiest month, after Ramaḍān. Since the Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar, Muharram moves from year to year when compared with the Gregorian calendar.

The tenth day of Muharram is known as the Day of Ashura, part of the Mourning of Muharram for Shia Muslims and a day of fasting for Sunni Muslims. The practice of fasting during Ashura stems from the hadith that Musa (Moses) and his people obtained a victory over the Egyptian Pharaoh on the 10th day of Muharram; accordingly Muhammad asked Muslims to fast on this day and on the day prior, the Day of Tasu'a.

Shia Muslims mourn the death of Ḥusayn ibn ʿAlī and his family, honoring the martyrs by prayer and abstinence from joyous events. Shia Muslims do not fast on the 10th of Muharram, but some will not eat or drink until zawal (afternoon) to show their sympathy with Husayn.[3] In addition there is an important ziyarat book, the Ziyarat Ashura about Husayn ibn Ali. In the Shia sect, it is popular to read this ziyarat on this date.

Begins: All day on September 10, 2019

Ends: on September 10, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

MUHARRAM ]]>
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TEACHER'S DAY https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=26 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 13:16:15 +0000 admin TEACHER'S DAY
Teachers' Day is a special day for the appreciation of teachers, and may include celebrations to honor them for their special contributions in a particular field area, or the community in general.

The idea of celebrating Teachers' Day took root in many countries during the 19th century; in most cases, they celebrate a local educator or an important milestone in education. This is the primary reason why countries celebrate this day on different dates, unlike many other International Days. For example, Argentina has commemorated Domingo Faustino Sarmiento's death on 11 September) since 1915;[1] while in India Guru Purnima is traditionally observed as a day to venerate teachers, the birthday of the second president Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan (5 September) is also celebrated as Teacher's Day since 1962.

Many countries celebrate World Teachers' Day, established by UNESCO in 1994, on 5 October as their Teachers' Day.[2]

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2019-09-05T00:00:00 2019-09-05T23:59:59

TEACHER'S DAY

TEACHER'S DAY
Teachers' Day is a special day for the appreciation of teachers, and may include celebrations to honor them for their special contributions in a particular field area, or the community in general.

The idea of celebrating Teachers' Day took root in many countries during the 19th century; in most cases, they celebrate a local educator or an important milestone in education. This is the primary reason why countries celebrate this day on different dates, unlike many other International Days. For example, Argentina has commemorated Domingo Faustino Sarmiento's death on 11 September) since 1915;[1] while in India Guru Purnima is traditionally observed as a day to venerate teachers, the birthday of the second president Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan (5 September) is also celebrated as Teacher's Day since 1962.

Many countries celebrate World Teachers' Day, established by UNESCO in 1994, on 5 October as their Teachers' Day.[2]

Begins: All day on September 5, 2019

Ends: on September 5, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

TEACHER'S DAY ]]>
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SAMVATSARI https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=25 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 13:09:12 +0000 admin SAMVATSARI
Saṃvatsarī (Sanskrit: संवत्सरी) (lit. Annual Day or fig. Forgiveness Day) is the last day of Paryushana festival observed annually by the followers of Shwetambar sect of Jainism. It falls on Shukla Panchami (5th day of waxing fortnight) each year in Jain calendar month of Bhadrapada, somewhere between the middle of August and September in the Gregorian calendar.

On this day, Jains forgive and seek forgiveness for their mistakes committed knowingly or unknowingly from all the living beings. A yearly, elaborate penitential retreat called "samvatsari pratikramana" is performed on this day. After the pratikramana, Jains seek forgiveness from all the creatures of the world, including friends and relatives by uttering the phrase — Micchami Dukkadam or its variants like "Khamau Sa", "Uttam Kshama" or "Khamat Khamna".

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2019-09-02T00:00:00 2019-09-02T23:59:59

SAMVATSARI

SAMVATSARI
Saṃvatsarī (Sanskrit: संवत्सरी) (lit. Annual Day or fig. Forgiveness Day) is the last day of Paryushana festival observed annually by the followers of Shwetambar sect of Jainism. It falls on Shukla Panchami (5th day of waxing fortnight) each year in Jain calendar month of Bhadrapada, somewhere between the middle of August and September in the Gregorian calendar.

On this day, Jains forgive and seek forgiveness for their mistakes committed knowingly or unknowingly from all the living beings. A yearly, elaborate penitential retreat called "samvatsari pratikramana" is performed on this day. After the pratikramana, Jains seek forgiveness from all the creatures of the world, including friends and relatives by uttering the phrase — Micchami Dukkadam or its variants like "Khamau Sa", "Uttam Kshama" or "Khamat Khamna".

Begins: All day on September 2, 2019

Ends: on September 2, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

SAMVATSARI ]]>
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JANMASHTAMI https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=24 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 12:57:34 +0000 admin JANMASHTAMI
Krishna Janmashtami, also known simply as Janmashtami or Gokulashtami, is an annual Hindu festival that celebrates the birth of Krishna, the eighth avatar of Vishnu. It is observed according to Hindu luni-solar calendar, on the eighth day (Ashtami) of the Krishna Paksha (dark fortnight) in Shraavana of the lunar Hindu Calendar and Krishna Paksha in Bhadrapad of the lunisolar Hindu Calendar, which overlaps with August and September of the Gregorian calendar.

Best Reference Site For Krishna janmashtami. Visit https://janmashtami.in/

It is an important festival particularly to the Vaishnavism tradition of Hinduism. Dance-drama enactments of the life of Krishna according to the Bhagavata Purana (such as Rasa lila or Krishna Lila), devotional singing through the midnight when Krishna is believed to have been born, fasting (upavasa), a night vigil (jagarata), and a festival (mahotsava) on the following day are a part of the Janmashtami celebrations. It is celebrated particularly in Mathura and Brindavan, along with major Vaishnava and non-sectarian communities found in Manipur, Assam, West Bengal, Odisha, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and other regions.

Krishna Janmashtami is followed by the festival Nandotsav, which celebrates the occasion when Nanda Baba distributed gifts to the community in honour of the birth.

Significance
Krishna Carried Across the River

Krishna was the son of Devaki and Vasudeva and his birthday is celebrated by Hindus as Janmashtami, particularly those of the Vaishnavism tradition as he is considered the eighth avatar of Vishnu. Janmashtami is celebrated when Krishna is believed to have been born according to Hindu tradition, which is in Mathura, at midnight on the eighth day of Bhadrapada month (overlaps with August and 3 September in the Gregorian calendar).

Krishna was born in an era of chaos, persecution was rampant, freedoms were denied, evil was everywhere, and when there was a threat to his life by his uncle King Kansa. Immediately following the birth at Nathdwara, his father Vasudeva took Krishna across Yamuna, to foster parents in Gokul, named Nanda and Yashoda. [citation needed] This legend is celebrated on Janmashtami by people keeping fast, singing devotional songs of love for Krishna, and keeping a vigil into the night. After Krishna's midnight hour birth, statues of baby Krishna are washed and clothed, then placed in a cradle. The devotees then break their fast, by sharing food and sweets. Women draw tiny foot prints outside their house doors and kitchen, walking towards their house, a symbolism for Krishna's journey into their homes.

Celebrations
Some communities celebrate Krishna's legends such as him as a Makkan chor (butter thief).

Hindus celebrate Janmashtami by fasting, singing, praying together, preparing and sharing special food, night vigils and visiting Krishna or Vishnu temples. Major Krishna temples organize recitation of Bhagavata Purana and Bhagavad Gita. Many communities organize dance-drama events called Rasa Lila or Krishna Lila. The tradition of Rasa Lila is particularly popular in Mathura region, in northeastern states of India such as Manipur and Assam, and in parts of Rajasthan and Gujarat. It is acted out by numerous teams of amateur artists, cheered on by their local communities, and these drama-dance plays begin a few days before each Janmashtami.

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2019-08-24T00:00:00 2019-08-24T23:59:59

JANMASHTAMI

JANMASHTAMI
Krishna Janmashtami, also known simply as Janmashtami or Gokulashtami, is an annual Hindu festival that celebrates the birth of Krishna, the eighth avatar of Vishnu. It is observed according to Hindu luni-solar calendar, on the eighth day (Ashtami) of the Krishna Paksha (dark fortnight) in Shraavana of the lunar Hindu Calendar and Krishna Paksha in Bhadrapad of the lunisolar Hindu Calendar, which overlaps with August and September of the Gregorian calendar.

Best Reference Site For Krishna janmashtami. Visit https://janmashtami.in/

It is an important festival particularly to the Vaishnavism tradition of Hinduism. Dance-drama enactments of the life of Krishna according to the Bhagavata Purana (such as Rasa lila or Krishna Lila), devotional singing through the midnight when Krishna is believed to have been born, fasting (upavasa), a night vigil (jagarata), and a festival (mahotsava) on the following day are a part of the Janmashtami celebrations. It is celebrated particularly in Mathura and Brindavan, along with major Vaishnava and non-sectarian communities found in Manipur, Assam, West Bengal, Odisha, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and other regions.

Krishna Janmashtami is followed by the festival Nandotsav, which celebrates the occasion when Nanda Baba distributed gifts to the community in honour of the birth.

Significance
Krishna Carried Across the River

Krishna was the son of Devaki and Vasudeva and his birthday is celebrated by Hindus as Janmashtami, particularly those of the Vaishnavism tradition as he is considered the eighth avatar of Vishnu. Janmashtami is celebrated when Krishna is believed to have been born according to Hindu tradition, which is in Mathura, at midnight on the eighth day of Bhadrapada month (overlaps with August and 3 September in the Gregorian calendar).

Krishna was born in an era of chaos, persecution was rampant, freedoms were denied, evil was everywhere, and when there was a threat to his life by his uncle King Kansa. Immediately following the birth at Nathdwara, his father Vasudeva took Krishna across Yamuna, to foster parents in Gokul, named Nanda and Yashoda. [citation needed] This legend is celebrated on Janmashtami by people keeping fast, singing devotional songs of love for Krishna, and keeping a vigil into the night. After Krishna's midnight hour birth, statues of baby Krishna are washed and clothed, then placed in a cradle. The devotees then break their fast, by sharing food and sweets. Women draw tiny foot prints outside their house doors and kitchen, walking towards their house, a symbolism for Krishna's journey into their homes.

Celebrations
Some communities celebrate Krishna's legends such as him as a Makkan chor (butter thief).

Hindus celebrate Janmashtami by fasting, singing, praying together, preparing and sharing special food, night vigils and visiting Krishna or Vishnu temples. Major Krishna temples organize recitation of Bhagavata Purana and Bhagavad Gita. Many communities organize dance-drama events called Rasa Lila or Krishna Lila. The tradition of Rasa Lila is particularly popular in Mathura region, in northeastern states of India such as Manipur and Assam, and in parts of Rajasthan and Gujarat. It is acted out by numerous teams of amateur artists, cheered on by their local communities, and these drama-dance plays begin a few days before each Janmashtami.

Begins: All day on August 24, 2019

Ends: on August 24, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

JANMASHTAMI ]]>
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SITALA SATAM https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=23 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 12:52:48 +0000 admin SATAM
One story says Goddess Durga has incarnated as little Kātyāyanī — daughter of sage Katyayan — to destroy all arrogant evil demonic forces of the world, in her real form as Durga, she killed many demons that were sent by Kaalkeya.

A demon named Jwarasur, the demon of fever, started spreading incurable diseases to Katyayani's childhood friends, such as cholera, dysentery, measles, and smallpox. Katyayani cured the diseases of some of her friends. To relieve the world from all fevers and diseases, Katyayani assumed the form of Shitala Devi. Each of her four hands held a short broom, winnowing fan, jar of cooling water and a drinking cup. With her power, she cured all the children's diseases. Katyayani then requests her friend, Batuk to go out and confront the demon Jwarasur. A battle ensued between the young Batuk and demon Jwarasur. Jwarasur succeeds in defeating Batuk. Then, Batuk, lying dead, magically faded into dust. Jwarasur was shocked that Batuk had disappeared and wondered where he had gone, not realising that Batuk had, in fact, assumed the form of an awful male figure with three eyes and four arms holding a battle-axe, sword, trident and demon head. This figure was pitch-black in colour with flowing locks and eyes ablaze with fury and wore a tiger-skin and a garland of skulls - for Batuk had assumed the appearance of Lord Shiva's ferocious form, the terrible Bhairav. Bhairav reprimands Jwarasur and tells him that he is the servant of Goddess Durga (incarnate as Katyayani). A long discussion ensued but then converted into battle. Jwarasur created many demons from his powers but Bhairav managed to destroy all of them. Finally, Bhairav wrestled with Jwarasur and killed him with his trident.

There once was a demon named Jwarasur. He was named Jwarasur because he is the demon of fever. He went around and spread incurable fever to all the children of their parents wherever he went. His terrifying presence alarmed those who were around him and none of the children ever got relieved because of him. Mothers were crying and they wailed, and doctors couldn't find a cure for the children's incurable fever. Knowing that Jwarasur's reign of terror will keep spreading, Mahadev and Parvati decided to take action against him to stop him. Parvati decides that the power of her coolness will bring relief to all the children and their parents. Mahadev transformed himself into Bhairav and reaches the battlefield where he confronted Jwarasur to prevent him from going around and doing any more harm to children. Both of them indulged themselves in a great and huge wrestling match.

Meanwhile, Parvati on the other hand, transformed herself into Sheetala Devi. Sheetala Devi resembles a maiden, she was fair in complexion, wearing light and dark blue robes, wearing a minimal amount of ornaments on her limbs, three-eyed and is looking very youthful in appearance while representing an omnipotent Goddess, as being one among the incarnations of Durga. In her four hands, she held a bowl, a fan, a small broom, or a winnowing fan of some sort and she carries a pot of cold water, in which she uses to cure the diseased. She was mounted on the back of a donkey as her vehicle. Goddess Sheetala started her mission on providing relief to the children. Wherever Goddess Sheetala went around and over the world, with her most effective tool, her cold and cooling water brought relief to all children, of all shapes, sizes, colors, and ages. They were all completely restored to their good health, which brought instant relief to them and to joy to all the parents. Seeing Goddess Sheetala, everybody paid their homage to her and all the children thanked her for curing their incurable fever and purifying them.

Then, Goddess Sheetala makes an appearance in the battlefield where Bhairav and Jwarasur were fighting against each other. Sheetala Devi berates Jwarasur for his misdeeds towards young children as he spread fever to them. Bhairav also lets Jwarasur know that not only can Goddess Sheetala cure poxes, sores, ghouls, pustules and diseases, she is a goddess of sores, ghouls, and diseases and she can give them too. She is the cause as well as the cure. Finally, Sheetala Devi severely infected Jwarasur with an intense case of smallpox, thus putting an end to his reign of terror for once and for all. Mahadev liberates himself from Bhairav and Parvati frees herself from Goddess Sheetala Devi. They both returned home to Kailash.

]]>
2019-08-23T00:00:00 2019-08-23T23:59:59

SITALA SATAM

SATAM
One story says Goddess Durga has incarnated as little Kātyāyanī — daughter of sage Katyayan — to destroy all arrogant evil demonic forces of the world, in her real form as Durga, she killed many demons that were sent by Kaalkeya.

A demon named Jwarasur, the demon of fever, started spreading incurable diseases to Katyayani's childhood friends, such as cholera, dysentery, measles, and smallpox. Katyayani cured the diseases of some of her friends. To relieve the world from all fevers and diseases, Katyayani assumed the form of Shitala Devi. Each of her four hands held a short broom, winnowing fan, jar of cooling water and a drinking cup. With her power, she cured all the children's diseases. Katyayani then requests her friend, Batuk to go out and confront the demon Jwarasur. A battle ensued between the young Batuk and demon Jwarasur. Jwarasur succeeds in defeating Batuk. Then, Batuk, lying dead, magically faded into dust. Jwarasur was shocked that Batuk had disappeared and wondered where he had gone, not realising that Batuk had, in fact, assumed the form of an awful male figure with three eyes and four arms holding a battle-axe, sword, trident and demon head. This figure was pitch-black in colour with flowing locks and eyes ablaze with fury and wore a tiger-skin and a garland of skulls - for Batuk had assumed the appearance of Lord Shiva's ferocious form, the terrible Bhairav. Bhairav reprimands Jwarasur and tells him that he is the servant of Goddess Durga (incarnate as Katyayani). A long discussion ensued but then converted into battle. Jwarasur created many demons from his powers but Bhairav managed to destroy all of them. Finally, Bhairav wrestled with Jwarasur and killed him with his trident.

There once was a demon named Jwarasur. He was named Jwarasur because he is the demon of fever. He went around and spread incurable fever to all the children of their parents wherever he went. His terrifying presence alarmed those who were around him and none of the children ever got relieved because of him. Mothers were crying and they wailed, and doctors couldn't find a cure for the children's incurable fever. Knowing that Jwarasur's reign of terror will keep spreading, Mahadev and Parvati decided to take action against him to stop him. Parvati decides that the power of her coolness will bring relief to all the children and their parents. Mahadev transformed himself into Bhairav and reaches the battlefield where he confronted Jwarasur to prevent him from going around and doing any more harm to children. Both of them indulged themselves in a great and huge wrestling match.

Meanwhile, Parvati on the other hand, transformed herself into Sheetala Devi. Sheetala Devi resembles a maiden, she was fair in complexion, wearing light and dark blue robes, wearing a minimal amount of ornaments on her limbs, three-eyed and is looking very youthful in appearance while representing an omnipotent Goddess, as being one among the incarnations of Durga. In her four hands, she held a bowl, a fan, a small broom, or a winnowing fan of some sort and she carries a pot of cold water, in which she uses to cure the diseased. She was mounted on the back of a donkey as her vehicle. Goddess Sheetala started her mission on providing relief to the children. Wherever Goddess Sheetala went around and over the world, with her most effective tool, her cold and cooling water brought relief to all children, of all shapes, sizes, colors, and ages. They were all completely restored to their good health, which brought instant relief to them and to joy to all the parents. Seeing Goddess Sheetala, everybody paid their homage to her and all the children thanked her for curing their incurable fever and purifying them.

Then, Goddess Sheetala makes an appearance in the battlefield where Bhairav and Jwarasur were fighting against each other. Sheetala Devi berates Jwarasur for his misdeeds towards young children as he spread fever to them. Bhairav also lets Jwarasur know that not only can Goddess Sheetala cure poxes, sores, ghouls, pustules and diseases, she is a goddess of sores, ghouls, and diseases and she can give them too. She is the cause as well as the cure. Finally, Sheetala Devi severely infected Jwarasur with an intense case of smallpox, thus putting an end to his reign of terror for once and for all. Mahadev liberates himself from Bhairav and Parvati frees herself from Goddess Sheetala Devi. They both returned home to Kailash.

Begins: All day on August 23, 2019

Ends: on August 23, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

SITALA SATAM ]]>
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PATETI https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=22 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 12:47:50 +0000 admin Navroz or Pateti is the Parsi and it is celebrated on the eve of New Year of the Zoroastrian calendar. On pateti day the parsis visit the fire temple or agiary. The agiary is called as a fire temple because the sacred fire which was brought from Iran once upon a time is always kept burning in the temple by the high priest. The parsis worship Ahura Mazda, symbolised by fire. The parsis on this day, promise to live with good thoughts, use good words and perform the right actions.

The word pateti is derived from Pazend patet, meaning 'repentance'. The Zoroastrian tenets are based on the three ideals of good thoughts, good words and good deeds. Anything that is out of accord with this is considered a sin.It is natural for anyone to have committed a sin in the course of a year, even if only inadvertently. Pateti is the occasion to redeem oneself by offering patet, or the prayer of repentance, and prepare to greet the new year with a clean conscience.It is also a day of thanksgiving, to be grateful to God not just for the joys of life but also the sorrows.

Parsis wear their kusti or sacred vest. The men wear their traditional dress called dagli and the women dress up in their traditional and heirloom gara sarees. In the agiary a puja (jashan) is performed and sandalwood is offered to the fire.

At this time, the parsis clean their houses and decorate them. Torans and flowers are used to decorate the entrance of the house and beautiful rangoli patterns are made of birds, flowers, fish or any other design. On this day, parsi families go and visit other parsis and exchange gifts and sweets. On this auspicious occasion, special food like Patra ni macchi (fish wrapped in banana leaves), sali boti (meat with potato chips), rava and falooda is also prepared.

Parsis lay down certain auspicious items on the table on the day of New Year. It includes a sacred book, a picture of Zarathustra, mirror, candles, incense burner, fruits, flowers, a goldfish bowl, sugar, bread and some coins. These things symbolize prosperity and longevity for the family members.

A sweet Ravo (made from sugar, milk and suji) and vermicelli are the best breakfast for Navroz. After breakfast, whole family visits a nearby Fire Temple or Agiary. Priests perform a thanks giving prayer in the temple called Jashan and the congregation offers sandalwood to the Holy Fire with covered heads. They wish each other ‘Sal Mubarak'.

Parsi Navroz lunch consists of pulav (with nuts and saffron), fish and other spicy non-vegetarian food. Cooking plain rice and moong dal is a must in Parsi community. Every visitor to the house is welcomed with sprinkle of rose water and offering faluda (rose flavored chilled vermicelli). Thus Navroz is celebrated very joyously.

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2019-08-17T00:00:00 2019-08-17T23:59:59

PATETI

Navroz or Pateti is the Parsi and it is celebrated on the eve of New Year of the Zoroastrian calendar. On pateti day the parsis visit the fire temple or agiary. The agiary is called as a fire temple because the sacred fire which was brought from Iran once upon a time is always kept burning in the temple by the high priest. The parsis worship Ahura Mazda, symbolised by fire. The parsis on this day, promise to live with good thoughts, use good words and perform the right actions.

The word pateti is derived from Pazend patet, meaning 'repentance'. The Zoroastrian tenets are based on the three ideals of good thoughts, good words and good deeds. Anything that is out of accord with this is considered a sin.It is natural for anyone to have committed a sin in the course of a year, even if only inadvertently. Pateti is the occasion to redeem oneself by offering patet, or the prayer of repentance, and prepare to greet the new year with a clean conscience.It is also a day of thanksgiving, to be grateful to God not just for the joys of life but also the sorrows.

Parsis wear their kusti or sacred vest. The men wear their traditional dress called dagli and the women dress up in their traditional and heirloom gara sarees. In the agiary a puja (jashan) is performed and sandalwood is offered to the fire.

At this time, the parsis clean their houses and decorate them. Torans and flowers are used to decorate the entrance of the house and beautiful rangoli patterns are made of birds, flowers, fish or any other design. On this day, parsi families go and visit other parsis and exchange gifts and sweets. On this auspicious occasion, special food like Patra ni macchi (fish wrapped in banana leaves), sali boti (meat with potato chips), rava and falooda is also prepared.

Parsis lay down certain auspicious items on the table on the day of New Year. It includes a sacred book, a picture of Zarathustra, mirror, candles, incense burner, fruits, flowers, a goldfish bowl, sugar, bread and some coins. These things symbolize prosperity and longevity for the family members.

A sweet Ravo (made from sugar, milk and suji) and vermicelli are the best breakfast for Navroz. After breakfast, whole family visits a nearby Fire Temple or Agiary. Priests perform a thanks giving prayer in the temple called Jashan and the congregation offers sandalwood to the Holy Fire with covered heads. They wish each other ‘Sal Mubarak'.

Parsi Navroz lunch consists of pulav (with nuts and saffron), fish and other spicy non-vegetarian food. Cooking plain rice and moong dal is a must in Parsi community. Every visitor to the house is welcomed with sprinkle of rose water and offering faluda (rose flavored chilled vermicelli). Thus Navroz is celebrated very joyously.

Begins: All day on August 17, 2019

Ends: on August 17, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

PATETI ]]>
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RAKSHABANDHAN https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=21 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 12:36:07 +0000 admin RAKSHABANDHAN
Raksha Bandhan, also Rakshabandhan, is a popular, traditionally Hindu, annual rite, or ceremony, which is central to a festival of the same name, celebrated in parts of the Indian subcontinent, and among people around the world influenced by culture from the Indian subcontinent. On this day, sisters of all ages tie a talisman, or amulet, called the rakhi, around the wrists of their brothers, symbolically protecting them, receiving a gift in return, and traditionally investing the brothers with a share of the responsibility of their potential care.

Raksha Bandhan is observed on the last day of the Hindu lunar calendar month of Shraavana, which typically falls in August. The expression "Raksha Bandhan," Sanskrit, literally, "the bond of protection, obligation, or care," is now principally applied to this ritual. Until the mid-20th-century, the expression was more commonly applied to a similar ritual, also held on the same day, with precedence in ancient Hindu texts, in which a domestic priest ties amulets, charms, or threads on the wrists of his patrons, or changes their sacred thread, and receives gifts of money; in some places, this is still the case. In contrast, the sister-brother festival, with origins in folk culture, had names which varied with location, with some rendered as Saluno,Silono, and Rakri. A ritual associated with Saluno included the sisters placing shoots of barley behind the ears of their brothers.

Of special significance to married women, Raksha Bandhan is rooted in the practice of territorial or village exogamy, in which a bride marries out of her natal village or town, and her parents, by custom, do not visit her in her married home. In rural north India, where village exogamy is strongly prevalent, large numbers of married Hindu women travel back to their parents' homes every year for the ceremony. Their brothers, who typically live with the parents or nearby, sometimes travel to their sisters' married home to escort them back. Many younger married women arrive a few weeks earlier at their natal homes and stay until the ceremony.The brothers serve as lifelong intermediaries between their sisters' married and parental homes, as well as potential stewards of their security.

In urban India, where families are increasingly nuclear, the festival has become more symbolic, but continues to be highly popular. The rituals associated with this festival have spread beyond their traditional regions and have been transformed through technology and migration,[14] the movies, social interaction, and promotion by politicized Hinduism, as well as by the nation state.
Among women and men who are not blood relatives, there is also a transformed tradition of voluntary kin relations, achieved through the tying of rakhi amulets, which have cut across caste and class lines, and Hindu and Muslim divisions. In some communities or contexts, other figures, such as a matriarch, or a person in authority, can be included in the ceremony in ritual acknowledgement of their benefaction.

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2019-08-15T00:00:00 2019-08-15T23:59:59

RAKSHABANDHAN

RAKSHABANDHAN
Raksha Bandhan, also Rakshabandhan, is a popular, traditionally Hindu, annual rite, or ceremony, which is central to a festival of the same name, celebrated in parts of the Indian subcontinent, and among people around the world influenced by culture from the Indian subcontinent. On this day, sisters of all ages tie a talisman, or amulet, called the rakhi, around the wrists of their brothers, symbolically protecting them, receiving a gift in return, and traditionally investing the brothers with a share of the responsibility of their potential care.

Raksha Bandhan is observed on the last day of the Hindu lunar calendar month of Shraavana, which typically falls in August. The expression "Raksha Bandhan," Sanskrit, literally, "the bond of protection, obligation, or care," is now principally applied to this ritual. Until the mid-20th-century, the expression was more commonly applied to a similar ritual, also held on the same day, with precedence in ancient Hindu texts, in which a domestic priest ties amulets, charms, or threads on the wrists of his patrons, or changes their sacred thread, and receives gifts of money; in some places, this is still the case. In contrast, the sister-brother festival, with origins in folk culture, had names which varied with location, with some rendered as Saluno,Silono, and Rakri. A ritual associated with Saluno included the sisters placing shoots of barley behind the ears of their brothers.

Of special significance to married women, Raksha Bandhan is rooted in the practice of territorial or village exogamy, in which a bride marries out of her natal village or town, and her parents, by custom, do not visit her in her married home. In rural north India, where village exogamy is strongly prevalent, large numbers of married Hindu women travel back to their parents' homes every year for the ceremony. Their brothers, who typically live with the parents or nearby, sometimes travel to their sisters' married home to escort them back. Many younger married women arrive a few weeks earlier at their natal homes and stay until the ceremony.The brothers serve as lifelong intermediaries between their sisters' married and parental homes, as well as potential stewards of their security.

In urban India, where families are increasingly nuclear, the festival has become more symbolic, but continues to be highly popular. The rituals associated with this festival have spread beyond their traditional regions and have been transformed through technology and migration,[14] the movies, social interaction, and promotion by politicized Hinduism, as well as by the nation state.
Among women and men who are not blood relatives, there is also a transformed tradition of voluntary kin relations, achieved through the tying of rakhi amulets, which have cut across caste and class lines, and Hindu and Muslim divisions. In some communities or contexts, other figures, such as a matriarch, or a person in authority, can be included in the ceremony in ritual acknowledgement of their benefaction.

Begins: All day on August 15, 2019

Ends: on August 15, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

RAKSHABANDHAN ]]>
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BAJARI-EID https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=19 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 12:28:47 +0000 admin 2019-08-12T00:00:00 2019-08-12T23:59:59

BAJARI-EID

Begins: All day on August 12, 2019

Ends: on August 12, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

BAJARI-EID ]]>
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RATH YATRA https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=15 Wed, 03 Jul 2019 18:06:40 +0000 admin Ratha Yatra

Ratha Yatra is a Hindu festival associated with Lord Jagannath held at Puri in the state of Odisha, India. It is the oldest Ratha Yatrataking place in India and the World, whose descriptions can be found in Brahma Purana, Padma Purana, and Skanda Purana and Kapila Samhita.

This annual festival is celebrated on Ashadha Shukla Paksha Dwitiya (second day in bright fortnight of Ashadha month).

The festival commemorates Jagannath's annual visit to Gundicha Temple via Mausi Maa Temple (aunt's home) near Balagandi Chaka, Puri.

As part of Ratha Yatra, the deities of Jagannath, his elder brother Balabhadra and younger sister Subhadra are taken out in a procession to Gundicha Temple and remain there for nine days.They are also accompanied by Sudarshana chakra. Then the deities or Ratha Yatra return to the Main temple. The return journey of Puri Jagannath Ratha Jatra is known as Bahuda Jatra.
Three richly decorated chariots, resembling temple structures, are pulled through the streets of Puri called Badadanda. This commemorates the annual journey of Lord Jagannath, Lord Balabhadra, and their sister Subhadra to their aunt's temple, the Gundicha Temple which is situated at a distance of 2 km from their temple. This is the only day when devotees who are not allowed in the temple premises, such as non-Hindus and foreigners, can get their glimpse of the deities. During the festival, devotees from all over the world go to Puri with an earnest desire to help pulling the Lords' chariots with the help of other priests pulling the chariots with ropes. They consider this auspicious deed. The huge processions accompanying the chariots play devotional songs with drums, tambourines, trumpets etc. Children line the streets through which the chariot will pass and add to the mass chorus. The Ratha carts themselves are approximately 45 feet (14 m) high and are pulled by the thousands of pilgrims who turn up for the event; the chariots are built anew each year only from a particular type of tree. Millions of devotees congregate at Puri for this annual event from all over the country and abroad. It is also broadcast live on many Indian, foreign television channels as well as many of the websites telecast jagannath ratha jatra live.

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2019-07-04T00:00:00 2019-07-04T23:59:59

RATH YATRA

Ratha Yatra

Ratha Yatra is a Hindu festival associated with Lord Jagannath held at Puri in the state of Odisha, India. It is the oldest Ratha Yatrataking place in India and the World, whose descriptions can be found in Brahma Purana, Padma Purana, and Skanda Purana and Kapila Samhita.

This annual festival is celebrated on Ashadha Shukla Paksha Dwitiya (second day in bright fortnight of Ashadha month).

The festival commemorates Jagannath's annual visit to Gundicha Temple via Mausi Maa Temple (aunt's home) near Balagandi Chaka, Puri.

As part of Ratha Yatra, the deities of Jagannath, his elder brother Balabhadra and younger sister Subhadra are taken out in a procession to Gundicha Temple and remain there for nine days.They are also accompanied by Sudarshana chakra. Then the deities or Ratha Yatra return to the Main temple. The return journey of Puri Jagannath Ratha Jatra is known as Bahuda Jatra.
Three richly decorated chariots, resembling temple structures, are pulled through the streets of Puri called Badadanda. This commemorates the annual journey of Lord Jagannath, Lord Balabhadra, and their sister Subhadra to their aunt's temple, the Gundicha Temple which is situated at a distance of 2 km from their temple. This is the only day when devotees who are not allowed in the temple premises, such as non-Hindus and foreigners, can get their glimpse of the deities. During the festival, devotees from all over the world go to Puri with an earnest desire to help pulling the Lords' chariots with the help of other priests pulling the chariots with ropes. They consider this auspicious deed. The huge processions accompanying the chariots play devotional songs with drums, tambourines, trumpets etc. Children line the streets through which the chariot will pass and add to the mass chorus. The Ratha carts themselves are approximately 45 feet (14 m) high and are pulled by the thousands of pilgrims who turn up for the event; the chariots are built anew each year only from a particular type of tree. Millions of devotees congregate at Puri for this annual event from all over the country and abroad. It is also broadcast live on many Indian, foreign television channels as well as many of the websites telecast jagannath ratha jatra live.

Begins: All day on July 4, 2019

Ends: on July 4, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

RATH YATRA ]]>
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INTERNATIONAL YOGA DAY https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=3 Wed, 03 Jul 2019 12:40:43 +0000 admin 2019-06-21T00:00:00 2019-06-21T23:59:59

INTERNATIONAL YOGA DAY

Begins: All day on June 21, 2019

Ends: on June 21, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

INTERNATIONAL YOGA DAY ]]>
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Republic Day https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=2 Wed, 23 Jan 2019 17:32:00 +0000 admin 2019-01-26T00:00:00 2019-01-26T23:59:59

Republic Day

Begins: All day on January 26, 2019

Ends: on January 26, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Republic Day ]]>
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Makar Sankranti https://vedantinternationalschoolnikol.org/my-calendar/?mc_id=1 Wed, 23 Jan 2019 17:31:21 +0000 admin 2019-01-14T00:00:00 2019-01-15T23:59:59

Makar Sankranti

Begins: All day on January 14, 2019

Ends: on January 15, 2019

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Makar Sankranti ]]>
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